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Hublot extends its already wide-ranging collection of ceramic-cased watches with its first minute repeater entirely cased in the high-tech material. The new Big Bang Integral Minute Repeater Ceramic, a 43mm model in white or black ceramic, joins the firm’s Integral Ceramic collection, which debuted in 2020.

The new Hublot Big Bang Integral Minute Repeater Ceramic, made in black or white ceramic.

Beyond its in-house distinction, the new Big Bang Integral Minute Repeater Ceramic is also the first watch of its kind (a tourbillon minute repeater) made by any watchmaker that has been cased entirely in ceramic, according to Hublot.

Like its brethren in the Integral Ceramic collection, the new watch is made with an all-ceramic case (here at 43mm) and with an integrated all-ceramic bracelet, bezel and case back. And the new watch also is Hublot’s first model regulated by a tourbillon within the collection.

Inside Hublot fits its own existing manual-wind MHUB801 caliber with eighty hours of power reserve. The watchmaker will make eighteen watches in black ceramic and eighteen in white ceramic.

Hublot has placed minute repeating movements into numerous watches in the past, sometimes also paired with a tourbillon. You might recall that in 2014, Hublot received a Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève (GPHG) for its Classic Fusion Cathedral Tourbillon Minute Repeater.

Price: $295,000.

 

Specifications: Hublot Big Bang Integral Minute Repeater Ceramic

References: Black Ceramic (458.CX.1170.CX.YOS, 18 pieces) and White Ceramic (458.HX.1170.HX.YOS, 18 pieces).

Dial: Black matte: Rhodium-plated satin appliques with black SuperLuminova or Grey matte: Rhodium- plated satin appliques with white SuperLuminova. Satin-finished and polished white or black ceramic bezel.

Case: Black or white 43mm by 14.15mm satin-finished and polished ceramic. Water resistance to 30 meters.

Movement: Hublot MHUB8001.H1.RH Caliber Hublot Tourbillon with manual winding cathedral minute repeater, frequency: 21,600 vph, power reserve of approximately 80 hours.

Bracelet: Satin-finished and polished black or white ceramic with titanium folding clasp.

Price: $295,000

 

 

At the recent Watches and Wonders 2022 in Geneva, Jaeger-LeCoultre hosted Didier Queloz, Professor of Physics at the University of Cambridge.

Queloz was jointly awarded the 2019 Nobel Prize in physics for his work in furthering the understanding of the universe and is the originator of the rise of ‘exoplanet’ research. His discovery (with his PhD supervisor) in 1995 of a giant planet orbiting another star outside of the solar system kicked off the rise of such research. Queloz assisted Jaeger-LeCoultre as it finalized the scientific accuracy of the Jaeger-LeCoultre Discovery Workshops.

After his interview at a keynote (above) event at Watches and Wonders in Geneva by Jaeger-LeCoultre CEO Catherine Rénier, Queloz answered some questions posed by International Watch. Here are portions of the interview, along with responses to questions by Jaeger-LeCoultre.

 

International Watch: Are we gaining a better understanding of the links between astronomical time and how we measure time on Earth?

 

Queloz: I think the astronomical time is not used anymore because it’s not precise enough. The Earth used to be the reference with the 24 hours and then the orbit around the sun. What happened is the Earth is not very stable. There’s a tiny bit of change into the rotation of the Earth because it’s a liquid. There’s not really a solid rigid body.

As soon as we started to realize that we had atomic clocks, the atomic clocks were way more precise to define the time. In the 1960s, people have moved from astronomical time to atomic time. All the time is not defined at all against the astronomy. But of course, for human reasons, we maintain the year, the hours and all these very strange minutes, which is all historical.

In fact, we have a different, very complex system of 24 hours and 60 minutes. It’s all something that is from the past, but we keep it because people get used to it. The society gets used to it.

The new Jaeger LeCoultre Master Grande Tradition Caliber 948.

How has Jaeger-LeCoultre made the measuring of astronomical time a simpler or possibly more interesting prospect for most people?

 

Well, I think what they did here was very, very clever. I think they’re trying to tell a complete story on the watch. What is featured in the watch is very well known, like motions of the moon.

What makes it complicated is to have something small, beautiful and precise in the case of the clock. That is really challenging because you can make a big clock and you have astronomical clocks from the 1960s on top of some buildings and some of them are beautiful and they’re already there and they’re still working but they’re huge. When you must make it in a smaller size, it’s a very complicated process. This is really the challenge.

The new Jaeger-LeCoultre Atmos Tellurium.

 

Which of the new Jaeger-LeCoultre watches do you prefer to wear, and why?

I enjoy the Reverso. My taste is very classic. I like mechanical watches. I like watches that turn. I like to see time passing. I’m not at all into the digital era; I’m even allergic to digital time. I like the approximate time of watches, of mechanical watches, in the sense that you tell the time on an old-fashioned dial with hours, minutes, etc.

That’s how I like to watch time passing, and I’m also fascinated by the object. Moreover, it’s a beautiful jewelry piece that a man can wear. For me, it’s the only piece I wear apart from my wedding ring…

A Reverso at the Atelier d’Antoine Reverso Discovery Workshop

Jaeger-LeCoultre: What is your profession?

As a physicist, I teach physics, although now I have less and less time to teach. Astrophysics is both my specialty and my favorite field of study. It encompasses a lot of subjects around diversity, which is how we understand planetary systems in the universe in a general sense. In short: planets around other stars.

The question directly related to this issue is the evolution of these planets, and in particular the possibility for some of them to allow life to develop there. Although recent, this is a field I’ve been working in for some years now. I started by finding the planets before defining them. Now I’m setting up experiments, networks and projects to try and prepare for what comes next.

All this involves budget, deadline and constructions problems… Not forgetting preparing the scientific programs. That’s a short summary of the diversity of what I do, which also includes coaching and mentoring. I guide and support students and younger colleagues in their chosen career path. A mixture of coaching and teaching, including a formal course on how planets are formed.

The new Jaeger-LeCoultre Master Hybris Artistica Caliber 945.

 

How do your discoveries and research impact your everyday life?

That’s a big question! There is work that’s personal and general work. I prefer to answer about my work in general because in this context the difficulty lies in the time between discovering a new finding and it being used by society.

Some discoveries are relatively simple. Take, for example, the first transistor. It dates back to the 1950s, but you can see that it in the end it didn’t revolutionize the world. And then, twenty, thirty years later, computers arrive. And this discovery radically changed how society works.

So in fact, there are discoveries that have a direct impact on our lives. The most fundamental discoveries are, of course, those linked to life, those that will allow us to treat people, to prolong life. This is basic knowledge, gained through “simple” curiosity at the start that then will have an impact on society.

A Jaeger-LeCoultre heritage stellar tellurium from the late 1800s.

 

In short, our lives are completely dominated by scientific findings in the general sense of the word, i.e. as a process of gaining knowledge. Astronomy is a little different as it provides general knowledge, some of which will have a philosophical impact. Astronomy’s main contribution is perhaps the realization that, for now, we are very much alone and that everything is very, very far away. And also, that we need to take great care of our planet.

 

Where does your passion for science come from?

I think I was born with it. I was born with an insatiable curiosity that has never been satisfied. Curiosity is generally always there, and it doesn’t just apply to physics. I could have done just about anything as long as it involved acquiring knowledge. In fact, I have a lot of different interests.

My greatest pleasure is turning up in the morning and being able to learn something, to find out what’s going on. I’m absolutely allergic to routine. I only like the unknown. All I want to do is explore new things. That’s what my day-to-day work is like.

The globe as seen in a recent Atmos clock.

What does receiving the Nobel Prize in Physics mean to you?

First of all, as you know it’s the ultimate award of all awards! This prize celebrates the impact of a major discovery that has significantly influenced our society and changed the world. This is why it generally takes a long time. As I was lucky enough to make this discovery at a very young age, I’ve now received a Nobel Prize at a relatively young age, compared to the average age of my colleagues who also receive this prize. It usually takes between 20 and 30 years to receive it, which shows once again the impact of science…

So the question is: what is the point of this prize? In fact, the impact of a fundamental discovery takes a long time to become integrated into common knowledge. Everyone now knows that there are planets around other stars. But 30 years ago, I can assure you, this was not obvious at all. The culture has changed from this point of view, that is to say, in terms of where we are in relation to the universe. To explain how I felt when I received this prize?

I would say that you become a custodian of a very humanist vision. Alfred Nobel was a visionary. You have to realize that at the end of the 19th century, he created an international prize at a time where there were many conflicts over land issues! This means that he created something that nobody had any idea about at the time. It’s hard to see that now because international structures have become so common. Nobel wanted to celebrate science in a universal way, because he considered science to be for the universal good of humanity.

The new Jaeger-LeCoultre Rendez-Vous Dazzling Star.

 

Which astronomical phenomenon fascinates you the most?

The sun. Because the sun is life! The universe itself is very inert. The sun is a magical and formidable machine. It’s the sun that transforms and produces all the elements in your periodic table (Editor’s Note – Mendeleev’s Table). This extraordinary machine brings life, gives birth to the components needed for life, which will then be able to develop on the planets. In my opinion, the sun is the most fascinating object. And we are lucky enough to have one every day. So let’s enjoy the sun while it’s here for another 4 billion years or so. We still have some time, that’s encouraging (laughs).

Up close on the new Master Hybris Artistica Caliber 945.

What is your personal connection with time? Do you live your life in a precise way?

Not at all. This morning, taking the car and arriving on time was a real challenge… I often tend to be late. I have a rather elastic view of time, simply because I don’t see it. I have a strong ability to concentrate, perhaps a little too much. That is to say, I forget time.

I frequently miss appointments and arrive late. Unfortunately, it’s not for lack of thinking about it. Luckily, it’s got much better thanks to alarms! So no, I am not at all reliable in terms of minutes and seconds.

What does watchmaking mean to you?

By its very construction, for me watchmaking represents the art of mechanics. In a way, watchmakers are the artists of mechanics. I find it extraordinary to be able to push mechanization to this point, this technology that, by the way, does not only apply to watches.

Many people nowadays are developing and using this high-precision technology. There are even men and women who have been trained in the watchmaking world and who apply this technology to making mechanical hearts, micro-parts that will be inserted into the human body.

This expertise has seen incredible development in Switzerland. Switzerland is truly one of the greatest centers in the world in this field, I would even say the greatest. There are no better mechanics working in micromechanics than those in Switzerland. It’s in this almost organic way that I feel the watchmaker’s work, unlike in the past, is no longer linked to chronometry itself.

A vintage portable sundial from Jaeger-LeCoultre.

Before, this notion of time and precision was predominant. It still exists of course, because there is quality, expertise and craftsmanship in the work that is being done. But today, in my opinion, time is no longer a watchmaker’s time. It’s now “atomic” time, therefore a physicist’s problem. Time is a problem for atomic clocks, for lasers – which is a completely different story.

But watchmaking keeps the most noble and beautiful aspects of time: the aesthetic part and the technological part of micromechanics. I’m still convinced that aesthetics should not be neglected as it touches on the timeless, the unchanging, the eternal aspect. The Parthenon and many other magnificent sites continue to be visited for their beauty. Quality aesthetics can last a long, long time.

 

What did you think when Jaeger-LeCoultre contacted you? If you could choose one Jaeger-LeCoultre watch, which one would it be?

I really like watches! That’s one of the reasons I accepted your invitation. I’m very happy to come up to the Vallée de Joux and visit your Manufacture. It’s an opportunity to visit Jura, to discover this environment that’s a little out of time, to discuss watchmaking and mechanics.

We will also be able to discuss our common passion for astronomical phenomena and other celestial wonders that the universe holds… So yes, I’m pleased and touched to have been contacted by Jaeger-LeCoultre. If I had to choose one watch? I’ll wait for you to let me discover them. Of course, I like your world famous Reverso very much, but I’m looking forward to see the others.

Do you have any passions outside Astrophysics?

I have too many! Unfortunately, I don’t have the time to devote to them. I like to be outside a lot, to go for walks. It’s a great pleasure to be able to take time for myself. I also enjoy gardening and DIY a lot. I like to do DIY, it’s an activity that takes my mind off things.

A few years ago, I used to fly planes. Unfortunately, I don’t have time to do that anymore and I would really like to start doing this again because it’s an activity I really enjoy. Flying gives me a feeling that I find absolutely extraordinary.

Like all good Swiss people, I also love to ski in the winter. I belong to the generation that was able to come home at noon and have lunch in front of the TV to watch the World Cup runs (laughs).

I was really immersed and grew up in this world of mountains, snow and skiing. I was a member of a ski club, a ski teacher… So it’s an activity that I really enjoy and that I do every winter. Unfortunately, not as much as I would like, but as often as possible. And I love the sun and sea any time of the year.

 

 

Zurich-based Ineichen Auctioneers will focus on collectible watches made of rose gold for “La Vie en Rose,” its March 12 auction. More than fifty watches will be on offer, with pieces from Vacheron Constantin, F.P. Journe, Daniel Roth, Cartier, Jaeger-LeCoultre and Audemars Piguet among the auction headliners.

Three pieces in particular are likely to stir the most collector interest: F. P. Journe’s Chronomètre à Résonance Sincere Limited-Edition No. 202-RN and Octa Calendrier Sincere Limited Edition No. 239-Q, and a Vacheron Constantin Malte Openworked Tourbillon.

F. P. Journe Chronomètre à Résonance Sincere Limited Edition No. 202-RN

F.P. Journe Chronomètre à Résonance Sincere Limited-Edition No. 202-RN 

(Estimate: CHF 200,000-300,000)

A limited-edition watch first purchased in 2006, this model features a 40mm by 9.1mm case in rose gold, a black mother-of-pearl dial and silver subdials patterned with Clous de Paris guilloché. It is powered by a thin manual-wound caliber 1499.2 with mainplate and bridges in solid 18-karat rose gold, and twin independent movement coupled with an aerodynamic resonance system. The watch is one of the rarest models in the Chronomètre à Résonance line as only ten pieces were produced.

F. P. Journe Octa Calendrier Sincere Limited Edition No. 239-Q

F.P. Journe Octa Calendrier Sincere Limited-Edition No. 239-Q 

(Estimate: CHF 150,000-200,000)

Also limited to ten pieces, this 2006 model’s rose gold case measures 38mm by 10.6mm. It features a black mother-of-pearl dial with silver subdial decoration in Clous de Paris guilloché, and is one of very few timepieces to include an annual calendar complication, automatic winding and five-day power reserve. Its annual calendar function indicates the date via the large central hand and advances automatically for months with 29, 30 and 31 days.

Soon after its launch, the Octa Calendrier won the Special Jury Award at the prestigious Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève in 2002.

Vacheron Constantin Malte Openworked Tourbillon

Vacheron Constantin Malte Openworked Tourbillon Ref. 30067/000R-8954

(Estimate: CHF 50,000-100,000)

With a rose gold case measuring 36mm x 36mm x 11.80mm, this watch was produced from 2000 to 2011 and features traditional skeletonization with ‘baroque lines’ and a hand-engraved “peacock tail” decorative pattern with meticulous finishing. Another feature is the caliber 1790SQ, which is one of the best traditionally skeletonized tourbillon movements and also Vacheron Constantin’s first in-house tourbillon movement.

In addition to this trio of headliners, these watches from Girard-Perregaux, Cartier and Daniel Roth will likely draw attention from many collectors.

Girard-Perregaux ww.tc Tourbillon Hours of the World

 

Girard-Perregaux ww.tc Tourbillon Hours of the World  

(Estimate: CHF 30,000-40,000)

This piece features the famed Girard-Perregaux three gold bridges, but here they’re visible through the back of the case, non via the dial side. This is meant to echo the design of the original pocket watch movement invented by Constant Girard in 1867 and patented in the US in 1884.  This Reference 99350 is a very rare variation of the design with a rose gold case measures 43mm x 13.15mm, a light cream dial with a world-time complication. Only a few pieces were produced annually from 2005 to 2010.

Cartier Tortue Monopoussoir

 

Cartier Tortue Monopoussoir Mk2 Ref. 2781 

(Estimate: CHF 20,000-30,000)

This watch, one of the first timepieces from the Collection Privée Cartier Paris (CPCP) introduced by Cartier in 1998, is equipped with a rare hand-wound movement, caliber 045 MC, developed by THA Èbauche – a collaborative movement manufacture founded in 1996 by independent watchmakers Vianney Halter, Denis Flageollet and François-Paul Journe.

This model features the caliber 045MC Mk2 version, which uses only monolithic steel springs (except for the fixing spring of the minute counter). There is no additional bridge. Purchased in 2004, the case of this piece is 18-karat rose gold, measuring 43mm x 34mm (with lugs) x 10mm.

Collectors can register pre-bids and participate in the auction live via the Ineichen Auctioneers website. Bids can also be made online at invaluable.com; liveactionauction.com or by phone via +41 44 298 11 44.

Source: Ineichen Auctioneers

 

Highlighting its LVMH Watch Week, Bulgari unveils BVL100, a new miniature mechanical movement, which Bulgari places inside the head of new snake-shaped Serpenti bracelet watches.

One of four new Bulgari Serpenti Misteriosi High Jewelry models with Bulgari’s new small mechanical movement.

Bulgari dubs the new movement Piccolissimo (Italian for “very small”), and it is indeed one of the smallest mechanical calibers available, measuring a wispy 12.30 mm in diameter and 2.50 mm thick.

“We believe this is the smallest round caliber currently on the market, and it opens up a new world of possibilities for us in this collection and beyond,” notes Antoine Pin, managing director of Bulgari Watches.

The new Bulgari BVL100 movement. Set inside the Serpenti Misteriosi head, the movement can be switched for left or right hand wear.

Bulgari launches the new caliber inside four lacquered and gem-set Serpenti Misteriosi watches.

With this 2022 debut, Bulgari re-establishes a mechanical time display within the Serpenti collection. The watch and jewelry maker debuted Serpenti in the 1950s outfitted with manual-wind calibers but in recent years has equipped the line with quartz movements. With only a few very limited exceptions, the Serpenti lines have been powered by quartz calibers since the late 1980s.

In addition to the new mechanical caliber, the Serpenti Misteriosi offers a wholly new convertible option: Each watch is designed to be worn on either wrist.

Bulgari has cleverly devised an interchangeable movement housing for Serpenti Misteriosi that can be removed from within the snake’s head and turned in the other direction to be visible on the left or right arm.

The Bulgari Serpenti Misteriosi offers a wholly new convertible option. Each watch is designed to be worn on either wrist.
The Bulgari Serpenti Misteriosi offers a wholly new convertible option. Each watch is designed to be worn on either wrist.

The movement

Bulgari explains that it builds the new BVL100 caliber with 102 components that in total weigh a mere 1.3 grams. In order to power the hands, watchmakers fit a 170mm-long mainspring into a barrel that measures 5mm thick and 1.47 mm across. And to ensure the greatest inertia, Bulgari opted for a white gold balance wheel.

The wearer views the time on the new Serpenti models by pressing the snake’s tongue, revealing the diamond-set dial. A bidirectional crown on the caseback controls Winding and time setting.

Since 2014 Bulgari has introduced a series of record-breaking (and award-winning) ultra-thin watches within its Octo Finissimo collection. With its new Piccolissimo caliber, Bulgari now expects to extend its dominance of ultra-thin watchmaking to what have traditionally been ‘ladies’ sized models with small diameters and high gemstone counts.

 

Kering, the multi-national fashion house that owns Gucci, Bottega Veneta, Balenciaga and many other well-known clothing, leather and jewelry brands, has agreed to sell Swiss watchmakers Girard-Perregaux and Ulysse Nardin to their current management team.

The Kering press release is below. We’ll keep you informed as we hear additional details about the deal.

“Kering announces the signature of an agreement to sell its entire stake (100%) in Sowind Group SA, which owns the Swiss watch manufacturers Girard-Perregaux and Ulysse Nardin, to its current management.

With a long tradition in watchmaking, Girard-Perregaux and Ulysse Nardin have continuously evolved since their acquisition by Kering, while preserving their identity. Combining an innovative approach to design and technical know-how, they have revamped their product universe, launched new iconic models, and reorganized their distribution, with the opening of directly operated stores and stronger ties with the leading watch distributors.

The Group has supported the two Houses in their development, strengthened their positioning and ensured they have adequate resources to finance their growth. It has confidence in the management in place to successfully pursue the work undertaken.

This transaction is in line with Kering’s strategy, giving priority to the Houses with the potential to become sizable assets within the Group, and to which it can provide decisive support over time.

“The extensive work carried out by the Group in recent years at Girard-Perregaux and Ulysse Nardin has laid the foundations for sustainable growth. Kering has demonstrated its ability to secure the conditions for the long- term development of entities leaving the Group, in the interest of their employees, partners, customers and local communities,” declared Jean-François Palus, Kering’s Group Managing Director.

“On the sound foundations laid thanks to Kering’s support and investments, we have the right setup and resources to implement a plan capable of ensuring the long-term development of both brands” declared Patrick Pruniaux, CEO of Girard-Perregaux and Ulysse Nardin since 2018.

The financial impacts related to this disposal will be reported in the accounts closed on December 31, 2021. The transaction is expected to be completed by the end of the first half of 2022.”