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A. Lange & Söhne has created a unique 1815 Chronograph Hampton Court Edition dedicated to raise funds for The Prince’s Trust, an educational and employment charity, when it is sold during a Phillips auction on November 6.

The A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Chronograph “Hampton Court Edition”, ref. 414.047.
The unique piece will be auctioned off for a good cause after the Concours of Elegance 2022.

The one-off watch will debut officially during this year’s Concours of Elegance, to be held September 2 to September 4 at Hampton Court near London. The new watch combines several unique features previously not seen within the 1815 collection. 

The 39.5mm by 11.8mm watch offers a first-ever black dial with sandstone-hue numerals and scales within a white gold case. Also new is the tachometer scale along the edge of the dial, created to underscore the link between motor sports and time measurement. Previous 1815 Chronographs feature a pulsometer scale around the dial.

The piece is held to the wrist with a black hand-stitched alligator leather strap secured with a white gold prong buckle.

 

The Glashütte-based watchmaker has fashioned a hinged back cover for the watch, which it has hand-engraved with the logo of the Concours of Elegance, a partner with A. Lange & Söhne since 2018.

Under the cover and dial you’ll find a Lange caliber L951.5 movement, initially launched in 2010, featuring a column-wheel control, a jumping minute counter and a flyback function. The manually wound caliber has a power reserve of sixty hours.

As is always the case with this watchmaker, the movement itself is as lavishly  decorated and finished as the dial and case. The caliber’s eye-catching, multi-level architecture is fully visible through the sapphire back and exhibits the chronograph’s switching processes. Notable, as ever, is the Lange hand-engraved balance cock. Click here for more details about the watch, the charity and the auction. 

Each year Nomos creates a watch to benefit the Nobel-Prize-winning-organization Doctors Without Borders. This year’s model, the Tangente 38 – 50 ans de Médecins Sans Frontières, is limited to 2,021 units worldwide and highlights the medical rescue organization’s mission with a large red twelve on the dial.

The Nomos Tangente 38 – 50 ans de Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders).

Red is the universal color of emergency and has been the color of Doctors Without Borders for fifty years.

At the top of the dial, the twelve in red celebrates the color of Doctors Without Borders for half a century.

According to Nomos, the red twelve is also intended to “raise aid awareness, encouraging even more people to provide support. Helping has quite possibly never been more important than now and with this watch.”

To specifically mark the emergency medical aid organization’s fiftieth year, Nomos has also attached a dark gray textile strap to the watch and adds an inscription at six o’clock that reads “50 ans de Médecins Sans Frontières”. The same inscription can be found engraved onto the solid steel caseback.

The Tangente 38 is a classic for the Glashütte-based Nomos. A best seller for twenty-five years, the watch is the clearest example of the brand’s minimalist tenets. The watch is fit with a Nomos Alpha in-house manual-wind movement, which Nomos adjusts to chronometer standards.

Nomos will donate 100 euros to per unit sold directly and without deduction to Doctors Without Borders. At $2,030, the special edition is priced exactly the same as the existing Tangente 38 model.

American watchmaker Roland G. Murphy, whose eponymous Pennsylvania-based RGM Watches pioneered independent watchmaking in the United States, has teamed with renowned watch photographer and artist Atom Moore to create a terrific limited edition series of ‘Fat Arrow’ military style watches.

The Equation of Time Fat Arrow.

The series, the Equation of Time Fat Arrow, reprises a late 2021 prototype developed by Moore and Murphy’s Equation of Time division, which specializes in watches designed with input from collectors. Moore’s original dial art piece “Fat Arrow” is based on the name given to the World War II-era watches with the larger dial arrows, which were used to signify British military equipment.

Starting with Moore’s Fat Arrow dial design, Murphy devised a complementary steel-cased 36mm military style watch.

As a result, the new Equation of Time Fat Arrow features a matte black dial, large crown, sword style hands and a ‘railroad’ minute track set with luminous dots and markers. Luminous material is also found on all the larger arrows on the dial.

As with many of RGM and Equation of Time offerings, customers can customize certain aspects of the Fat Arrow, including the finishing style on the case, crown and hands.

Visible through the caseback is a manual-wind Sellita SW210-1 finished with Geneva stripes and radially brushed gears. Price: $2,995 (limited edition of 99).

A. Lange & Söhne releases its 1815 Rattrapante with a platinum case, adding a new look to the highly complex chronograph with split-seconds mechanism. The German watchmaker had previously offered the watch, its first pure split-seconds model, only cased in its own Honey Gold alloy.

The A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Rattrapante, now in platinum.

The new look also provides a bright silver dial and dark blued hands that add a regal air to the watch. The watch’s classical railway-track minute scale and the large Arabic numerals retain watchmaker’s own historic style, especially apt for a collection named for the birth year of its founder Ferdinand A. Lange.

While the dial appears traditional, its layout is somewhat unusual for an A. Lange & Söhne chronograph. Watchmakers opted to place the 30-minute counter and the subsidiary seconds dial at 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock, respectively, on the vertical center axis, veering from the more traditional positions at 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock.

The watchmaker’s beautifully decorated caliber L101.2, fully visible through the sapphire-crystal caseback, treats the wearer to a micro-engineered show as gears and levers slide and click through elapsed and lap-time measurements, a display centered on the movement’s two column wheels. (See specifications below for details).

A. Lange & Söhne equips the movement with bridges and cocks made of untreated German silver, a screw balance, screwed gold chatons that secure the jewels and a hand-engraved balance cock. And of course all the levers, springs and jumpers are decorated with straight graining while all peripheral chamfers are polished.

A. Lange & Söhne will make the 1815 Rattrapante with a platinum case as a limited edition of 200 pieces. Price: Initially listed at $154,200, the price is now upon request.

 

Specifications: A. Lange & Söhne 1815 Rattrapante

(Ref. 425.025, 200-piece limited edition)

Movement: Lange manufacture caliber L101.2, manually wound, decorated and assembled by hand; precision-adjusted in five positions; plates made of untreated German silver; balance cock and chronograph bridge engraved by hand. Shock-resistant screw balance; balance spring crafted in-house, frequency 21,600 vph, precision-beat adjustment system with lateral setscrew and whiplash spring. Power reserve is 58 hours when fully wound.

Case: 41.2 mm by 12.6mm platinum. Crown for winding the watch and setting the time, two chronograph pushers, one pusher to operate the rattrapante (split-second) mechanism.

Dial: Solid silver.

Strap: Hand-stitched black alligator leather with platinum buckle.

Price: Initially listed at $154,200, the price is now upon request.

 

Three months after a Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon Bucherer Blue triple-axis tourbillon returned to Earth after seventeen days on the International Space Station, the watch has started another tour, this time in New York City.

The Jacob & Co. Astronomia Tourbillon Bucherer Blue.

On July 26 at Sotheby’s the watchmaker is auctioning the watch to benefit the Davidson Institute of Science Education, an Israeli non-profit organization that serves as the educational arm of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Until then, the watch, a spectacular 50mm sapphire-cased tour-de-force, is available to see at the Bucherer 1888 TimeMachine (from July 11 to July 17), and will be on exhibit at the Sothebys New York galleries from July 21 to July 25.

Eytan Stibbe, wearing the Astronomia Tourbillon Bucherer Blue.

The Astronomia Tourbillon Bucherer Blue was worn on the wrist of philanthropist Eytan Stibbe during the Rakia mission, which returned April 25. Stibbe and the watch orbited Earth 273 times during that period, clocking more than 7 million miles.

The watch features four orbs that are in constant motion: the dial, tourbillon cage, a spherical diamond that reflects the moon, and a magnesium-lacquered globe that reflects the Earth. All are finished in the Bucherer Blue color, meant to reflect its place in the retailer’s collection of custom-made, similarly hued watches made in partnership with a wide range of Swiss watchmakers.

A back view of the Jacob & Co. Astronomia Bucherer Blue, showing moon orbit.

“The Astronomia tourbillon is a truly unique, groundbreaking timepiece that elevates the art of watchmaking above the Earth, above time,” says Jacob Arabov, Founder & Chairman of Jacob & Co. “So the very idea of sending this special Astronomia into space, as you can imagine, was very exciting. It’s only fitting that the Astronomia Bucherer Blue ends up revolving around the Earth. The watch had the same viewpoint on us as we usually have on it. This reversal is typical of the way I envision the creation of timepieces.”

The Astronomia Tourbillon Bucherer Blue (left) and the new EpicX Bucherer Blue.

EpicX Blue launches

The EpicX Bucherer Blue Edition

Along with the Astronomia tourbillon auction, Jacob & Co. and Bucherer are also launching the EpicX Bucherer Blue Edition, a manual-wind skeleton watch inspired by the International Space Station mission.

This watch, a limited edition of eighteen, will be available exclusively in the U.S. at Bucherer (pricing coming soon). It features a titanium caseback with an engraving of an astronaut, clad in a spacesuit and helmet, eyeing the Earth from space.