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Panerai underscores its deep connection with divers of all types this week as it introduces the Luminor Marina 44mm − Guillaume Néry Edition (PAM01122).

Inspired by free diver and brand ambassador Guillaume Néry, Panerai has outfitted the new dive watch with a 44mm titanium case produced using Direct Metal Laser Sintering technology, which shapes titanium using a 3D printing process.

The new Panerai Luminor Marina 44mm − Guillaume Néry Edition (PAM01122),

Referencing Néry’s deep-dives, Panerai is also adding sporty touches such as a rubberized coating on the bezel, crown and bridge lever, a convex crystal and a dial with an eye-catching dégradé effect that Panerai says emulates “the shades produced as sunlight filters through the depths of the sea.”

Water resistant to 300 meters, the Luminor Marina 44mm − Guillaume Néry Edition is powered by Panerai’s own Caliber P.9010, a fairly thin automatic movement equipped with two barrels for a three-day power reserve. Panerai built a quick-change feature into this movement that allows the wearer to easily adjust the time and date with in one-hour increments, with the hour hand connected to the date indicator.

 

In addition, Panerai has equipped the watch with an especially sporty strap made from black recycled PET material with white stitching and a trapezoidal pin buckle.

Panerai is also enhancing the package of the boutique-only watch with its first white rubber strap emblazoned with ‘Officine Panerai.’ In each gift box buyers will find a screwdriver that will assist the owner when removing the buckle to swap straps.

The caseback includes an engraving depicting the silhouette of the freediver and Panerai Ambassador Guillaume Néry.

Panerai will make the new watch available in its own boutiques as a limited edition of seventy, each of which will be covered by a new seventy-year warranty.  Price: $18,900.  

 

Specifications: Panerai Luminor Marina 44mm − Guillaume Néry Edition (PAM01122—limited edition of 70 pieces, boutique edition).  

Movement: Automatic Caliber P.9010, 6mm thick, 28,800 vph, two barrels, three-day power reserve.

Panerai’s own caliber P.9010, with two barrels and supplying a three-day power reserve.

Case: 44mm by 16.2mm sandblasted DMLS titanium, safety lock crown protection device (protected by trademark) in sandblasted titanium, titanium bezel, crown and bridge lever with rubberized coating, sapphire crystal, twelve-sided screwed caseback, sandblasted titanium with DLC coating, engraved with the “70 Years Warranty” logo, water resistant to 300 meters.

Dial: Black with dégradé effect, sandwich structure with Arabic numerals and indexes 
in white SuperLuminova with green luminescence. Seconds at 9 o’clock, date at 3 o’clock.

Strap: Recycled PET, black with white stitching
 and trapezoidal pin buckle in titanium with DLC coating. Additional white rubber strap with luminescent
 “Officine Panerai” personalization.

Price: $18,900. 

By Marc Frankel

It goes without saying that Dive Watches are one of the most popular styles of men’s watches sold today. But what many don’t know is that invoking the “dive” moniker actually has legal implications. Writing the word “Divers 200M” or any similar mark with “Diver” written on the dial or case back immediately invokes ISO 6425. The ISO (International Organization for Standardization) is an international body that writes standards for the commercial industry.

Before we get into ISO 6425, let’s talk about dive watches first. In modern times, very few SCUBA divers actually rely exclusively on a wristwatch while underwater. As an example, my own dive master had a beautiful Rolex Submariner on his wrist during classroom lessons, but once we hit the water, the Rolex was replaced with a dive computer.

The newest Ball Watch Engineer Hydrocarbon NEDU features 600 meters of water resistance, enhanced shock resistance and strong anti-magnetic properties.

Pre-computer

Before the advent of these modern and multi-function computers, divers relied on their mechanical watches to keep track of the key data points of total time submerged as well as bottom time in order to calculate residual nitrogen in the blood, and determine when, how many, and how long decompression stops should be if needed.

The dive watch, in this case, was performing a critical function, where a malfunction could spell disaster for the diver. This is why the ISO spec was developed, because dive watches were so critically important as instruments that protected the user’s health and safety. Today the analog dive watch continues to be worn while diving, but is more of a fashionable backup in the unlikely case the computer fails.

The Seiko Prospex SPB189 features a silicone strap or a titanium bracelet with super-hard coating and tri-fold push button release clasp with secure lock and extender. 

ISO 6425 is a rigorous specification titled “Horology – Divers’ watches” that supersedes older specs first released in the mid 1990s. In essence, it spells out what qualities a Dive Watch must have, and the methods with which to test them.

ISO Tests

Among the tests that ISO 6425 calls for includes, but is not limited to; temperature extremes, day and night visibility, magnetic resistance, salt spray, shock resistance and of course, water resistance. Obviously, we all expect water resistance to be one of the parameters checked. However, since water resistance is so important to the function of the dive watch, the actual pressure (depth) to which the watch is tested is 25% beyond the stated water resistance limit of a particular watch.

The Ulysse Nardin Diver X Nemo Point limited edition.

For example, a dive watch rated to 200 meters (20atm) is actually tested to 250 meters in order to meet ISO 6425.  And it’s not a dry air test. It is a true wet test, with a follow up condensation test to see if any moisture has found its way into the watchcase.

Furthermore, ISO 6425 states that EVERY watch certified to the spec needs to have its own water resistance individually tested. This means that if you are wearing a watch bearing the “Divers” mark on the dial or case back, that particular watch has been tested to 25% beyond the depth stated on the dial. Not a sample, but the very piece you are wearing. This is the ONLY way to ensure it will perform flawlessly under the stresses of diving.

The new TAG Heuer Aquaracer 43mm Tortoise Shell Effect Special Edition.

On my YouTube channel I discuss ISO in detail in my Watch and Learn series. In addition to water resistance, another ISO test that was actually quite fun to perform was the requirement that the strap needs to withstand about forty pounds of pull (simulating getting snagged on something) without the spring bars popping or tearing the strap itself. It was a great test to replicate, and the results were pretty eye opening.

One of several new models within the Torgoen T43 Diver watch collection.

So the next time you see the word “Dive” on watch dial, you’ll know that you are looking at an individually proven and tested dive watch that meets or exceeds the ISO 6425 quality standard!

Thank you for reading, and thank you for watching.

Marc Frankel, Video Editor, About Time

Founder, Long Island Watch

 

 

Two brand-new releases from Seiko Prospex recall historic diver’s models from 1968 while a third new diver’s watch, offered on a silicone strap or a titanium bracelet, features a lighter titanium dial and a bracelet built with references to a Shogun’s helmet and armor.

The Seiko Prospex SPB189 ‘Shogun’ features a titanium bracelet with super-hard coating and tri-fold push button release clasp with secure lock and extender.

The movement

Seiko has updated both models with the solid 6R35 automatic mechanical movement, which is appreciated for both its robust nature as well as its 70-hour power reserve.

Bi-directional winding via the magic finger system adds power to the movement while wearing the watch, but you can also manually wind it as well. Also, for all the watch “hacks” out there fixated on stopping the second hand in order to coordinate their next mission, the 6R35 does in-fact offer this over-appreciated feature.

While critics may search for other depredations in the fact that the frequency of the caliber 6R35 at 21,600 vph is a bit slower than other Japanese options, accuracy is the same or similar to those slightly faster mechanical heartbeats. One wonders if the internet’s instant experts have considered that putting less stress on a system that will inevitably need service and/or repair down the road might actually be a benefit rather than a detriment.

The Seiko Prospex SPB191 ‘Shogun’ ($1,350 on silicone strap).

Shogun debuts

Seiko fits this movement into its Propex “Shogun” series (SPB189 and SPB191) are crafted in a 43.5 mm hardened titanium case rated to 200 meters of water resistance with the crown at the traditional 3 o’clock position. A super-huge date display is made even larger by a magnifying cyclops window, with a uni-directional diver’s bezel atop. The sapphire crystal over the dial will be difficult to mar or scratch unless you shatter it entirely.

Side view of the Seiko Prospex SPB191 ‘Shogun.’

Like its sister dive models, the Seiko Prospex ‘Shogun’ could not be any easier to read; Broad hands coated in a thick layer of LumiBrite glow brightly – just like the hour markers. Time is clearly of the essence with these masterful classics. Offered with a choice of a silicone strap at $1,350, or a titanium bracelet for an extra $200, the Shogun will be a fan favorite for both real and “desk” divers.

Side view of the SPB189 Seiko Prospex ‘Shogun.’

For Japanese warrior fans, Seiko says the triangular notches in the rotating bezel on this model resemble the ornaments of a traditional Shogun helmet. The yabane or “arrow feather” link shape of the bracelet version, according to the brand, calls to mind weapons and armor.

The Seiko Prospex SPB185 is a contemporary interpretation of Seiko’s famous Diver from 1968.

Steel Sixties

Bringing us back to 1968, the Seiko Prospex Diver SPB185 and SPB187 are slightly smaller at 42mm, slightly heavier as they are cast in steel, and slightly less expensive due to the aforementioned reasons.

The new Seiko Prospex SPD187 is a new interpretation of Seiko’s famous Diver from 1968.

Broader shoulders separate the sister-types, as does a crown migrated slightly south to the 4 o’clock position. Other nuances of design define each as the hands, markers, and bezel are endemic to each design. Otherwise these are very similar in the chassis build quality. Available only on a solid link steel bracelet, the 185 and 187 retail for $1,200. 

 

 

 

Torgoen extends its adventure-watch focus from the skies to the sea with the new nautically based T43 Diver watch collection.

Models within the new Torgoen T43 Diver watch collection.

U.S.-based Torgoen, known for its extensive line of high-value adventure and aviation-themed quartz and automatic watches, combines many of the features found in its existing lines into the new dive watch collection. These features include bold, luminous markers, wide ratcheting bezels, solid steel bracelets, 200-meters of water resistance and sapphire crystals.

Torgoen offers five 44mm watches within the collection. They are marked with a choice among three bezel colors (black, red or navy bezel) and two dial hues (black or blue). And unlike many sport-watch vendors, Torgeon doesn’t make the choice between a steel bracelet and a silicone strap difficult because the price difference is only $10 ($285 for steel bracelet models and $275 for silicone strap models). 

Silicone-strap Torgoen T43 Diver watches.

Even at this price, Torgoen is still able to provide small details on the watches you might not expect. These touches include an etched Torgoen logo on the inner case wall, a screw-down crown for extra water protection, and a custom two-layer dial.

Inside, Torgoen fits the well-known Ronda 515S quartz movement, which is built to handle the torque required to move the large hands of the T43 Collection. In addition, the Ronda caliber offers a power-saving mechanism whereby a pulled-out stem will reduce power consumption by approximately seventy percent, extending the watch’s battery life to a full two years.

Purchases of the T43 Diver Collection will be included in Torgoen’s partnership with Miracle Flights, the nation’s leading medical flight charity, which provides flights to families with children in need of life-changing medical care. A portion of proceeds from every watch sold on the brand’s site is donated to the non-profit organization.

 

Citizen takes its light-powered, GPS-connected wristwatch technology underwater this week as the Japanese watchmaker debuts two Promaster dive watches set for the first time with the Citizen Cal. F158 Eco-Drive Satellite Wave GPS movement. 

Citizen Promaster Eco-Drive Satellite Wave GPS Diver 200m, with Duratect-hardened Super Titanium case.

The new watches are being billed by Citizen as the first light-powered dive watch with GPS satellite capabilities. The newest Promasters are also fully compliant the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) standard for dive watches and feature water resistance to 200 meters.

Citizen Promaster / Eco-Drive Satellite Wave GPS Diver 200m, with black DLC Super Titanium case.

To use the new models beneath the waves, a diver first presses the push buttons at 2 o’clock and 4 o’clock simultaneously, which sends the watch into Dive mode. All functions, except time display, will then stop in order to prevent erroneous user operations. It will not enter into Dive mode if the charged battery amount is insufficient.

Both watches are cased with Citizen’s proprietary Super Titanium, which Citizen then enhances with a surface-treatment hardening technology called Duratect MRK. While both models measure 47mm in diameter, the blue dialed option (model CC5006-06L) is finished in a glossy black hue using a DLC layering technique, which enhances scratch resistance.

Sea of features

These are professional-level dive watches, echoing much of the Promaster collection, which features a range of high-spec dive, aviation and racing watches. Citizen has ensured that each model boasts a unidirectional bezel with knurled notches, a screw lock crown, sapphire crystal, charge capacity display function and light-level indicator.

And, as is required for ISO compliance, the Eco-Drive Satellite Wave GPS Diver 200m dials are easy to read with large, luminous indexes and hands.

Citizen’s proprietary light-powered Eco-Drive Cal.F158 will operate for about seven years on a full charge – even without a light source. This insures that the various high-tech functions will operate uninterrupted.

Thus, the watches will continue to receive location and time information anywhere in the world using GPS satellite signals. This data will automatically correct the time and world calendar. Even without GPS satellite function, the watch is rated to an accuracy of ± five seconds per month. The wearer can also manually adjust the crown to change city and calendar, if desired.

For experienced or aspiring divers, Citizen has emblazoned the dial ring on both watches with the abbreviated names of eight famous diving locations, including Sharm El Sheikh, Maldives, Phuket, Great Barrier Reef, Fiji, Hawaii, Galapagos and Fernando de Noronha.

Each watch comes with a urethane strap with extension band.

Citizen supplies each watch with a urethane band and an extension band for wet suit use.

Prices: $1,395 (Super Titanium case with black DLC coating and blue dial) and $1,350 (Super Titanium case and green dial).

 

Just a few months after releasing its BR 03-92 Grey LUM, Bell & Ross adds an even brighter brother to the LUM family with a limited edition BR 03-92 Diver Full LUM.

Where the previously seen dive watch features brightly illuminated numerals, hands and five-minute markers, this newest family member features a full dial painted with green SuperLuminova.

In addition to a fully painted dial, the new watch also glows with a second hue because Bell & Ross has filled the watch’s metallic applique skeletonized indexes and the numerals on the bezel with a different shade of green SuperLuminova.  In order to maximize the period of luminescence for these markers, Bell & Ross opted to use a type of SuperLuminova (C3) that offers very long durability in the dark.

Bell & Ross notes that ever since it debuted its first square-cased BR 03-92 dive models in 2017 the watchmaker has been sure that its dive collection maintains all international ISO 6425 standards for dive watches. Those standards include water-resistance to a minimum depth of 100 meters, the presence of a unidirectional rotating bezel with a graduated minutes scale, an operation indicator and luminescent markers, legibility in the dark; anti-shock and anti-magnetic protection.

With this newest model, Bell & Ross exceeds those standards by wide margins, with a 300-meter water resistance rating, a black ceramic uni-directional bezel (for enhanced contrasts) and, in reference to its name, superior dial legibility with a more-than-gimmicky focus on luminescence.

Added bonus: Bell & Ross includes a rubber strap and a fabric strap with each watch.

Price: $4,500.

  

Specifications: Bell & Ross BR 03 92 Diver Full LUM

(Ref: BR0392-D-C5-CE/SRB, a limited edition of 999 pieces.)

Movement: Sellita-based automatic Caliber BR-CAL.302

Functions: Hours, minutes, seconds and date.

Case: 42mm matte black ceramic, unidirectional rotating ceramic bezel with 60-minute scale, sapphire crystal, 300-meters of water resistance. 

Dial: Luminescent green painted with SuperLuminova. Metal applique skeleton Super-LumiNova-filled numerals and indices.

Straps: Woven black rubber and ultra-resilient black synthetic fabric with pin buckle of black PVD-coated steel.

Luminox underscores its direct links with the Pacific Ocean with the Pacific Diver 3120 Series, a new dive watch collection named for the body of water central to the Luminox story.

The watch brand, founded in California in 1989, initially designed its watches to align with requirements of the Navy SEALS, whose members train in the Pacific Ocean near San Diego. 

This new Pacific Diver 3120 Series of four 44mm by 12mm quartz-powered steel diver watches all boast a carbon uni-directional bezel and a healthy water resistance rating to 200 meters.

Luminox also ensures that each watch features a screw-in crown and caseback, sapphire crystal and Luminox’s own tritium-gas-based Always Visible dial illumination, which Luminox says will keep the dial readable in the dark for up to twenty-five years.

Luminox engraves its motto, “Every Second Counts,” on the stainless-steel caseback, which protects a Ronda 515 quartz movement.

The four versions of the Pacific Diver 3120 Series include: An all-black model with dark dial, black bezel and black DLC case ($595) sold on a rubber strap, a black dial and black bezel model sold on a steel bracelet ($640), a model with blue dial and a black bezel sold on a steel bracelet ($640), and a black dial and black bezel model on rubber ($545).

Alpina Watches has partnered with the Netherlands-based Gyre Watch to create the new Alpina Seastrong Diver Gyre Automatic collection featuring watchcases crafted from recycled materials. Sales of the watch, with its case forged from a mixture of fiberglass (30%) and plastic debris (70%) caught in fishing nets in the Indian Ocean, will support the National Park Foundation.

The new Alpina Seastrong Diver Gyre Automatic collection is composed of five models and is being officially launched to support World Oceans Day (June 8th). Alpina will donate $100 for every watch purchased through us.AlpinaWatches.com in order to help maintain the U.S. parks, both inland and coastal.

The collection

The full Seastrong Diver Gyre Automatic range includes three men’s models (44 mm, $1,395) and two models designed for women (36mm, $1,295).

All five watches share blue-shaded dials, including turquoise and dyed mother-of-pearl, and luminescent hands. Inside each watch Alpina places its Sellita-based AL-525 automatic movement.

In addition, as a dive model, the watch features the requisite unidirectional bezel and water-resistance to 300 meters.

The Alpina Seastrong Gyre Diver Automatic, 36mm size. Each case is made using recycled materials.

Alpina will ship all the new watches with one of three two-tone NATO-style straps made from recycled plastic bottles. In addition, Alpina will include a black vegetable leather strap made of recycled apple waste with every 44mm watch.

Gyre origins

Alpina explains that the word Gyre is a reference to giant circular ocean currents. The Geneva-based watchmaker adds that the new collection represents the start of a long-term collaboration with Gyre Watch.

Gyre Watch, founded in The Netherlands in 2017, makes watches from recycled ocean plastic. Local fishermen along the Indian Ocean earn a fee collecting fishing nets from the sea for recycling, which means Gyre also contributes to local economies.

Alpina will make the Seastrong Diver Gyre Automatic as a limited series of 1,883 pieces of each model, in reference to the year of Alpina’s founding. Each watch will be sold in an eco-friendly gift set made of recycled plastic and recycled plastic bottles.

To further enhance the collection’s ecological profile, Alpina is printing each watch’s guarantee and certificate of authenticity on one page of recycled paper and will utilize a paperless user manual, accessible via a QR code. The code will direct buyers to a dedicated site for the Gyre collection as well as the instruction and maintenance manual.

 

Seiko has re-created three early Seiko dive models as the watchmaker this year celebrates the 55th anniversary of its first dive watches. Now in the Prospex collection, the new models, which Seiko announced in March, are faithful to the original designs, though now with modern specifications and execution.

The three new Seiko Diver Re-creations.
The Original Seiko Diver’s watches from, respectively, 1968, 1965 and 1975.

 

       Two of the re-creations, echoing models from 1965 and 1968, are powered by the high-beat 8L55 movement; the 1975 re-creation carries Caliber 8L35. All three have sapphire crystals, and the 1975 re-creation has an increased anti-magnetic resistance of 40,000 a/m thanks to the dial made of pure iron. All three new models also share the same blue-gray dial.

The 1965 Diver’s Re-creation with new Seiko Hi-Beat movement inside.
The 1968 Diver’s Re-creation, also now fitted with a Seiko Hi-Beat movement.

All the straps also pay homage to the originals while being modern in both the material and color. All three watches will be made available as limited editions of 1,100. The 1965, 1968, and 1975 re-creations will be introduced in June, July, and August 2020 respectively. A special commemorative box with all three watches plus additional black straps will be available in May 2020. Just 100 sets will be released.

The 1975 Professional Diver’s 600m Re-creation, now water resistant to 1,000 meters.
This model has a titanium one-piece case and an outer case protector to echo the 1975 ‘Tuna’ original.

      In addition to this limited-edition trilogy, Seiko is also launching the 1965 Diver’s Watch Modern Re-Creation, an updated steel version of its first diver’s watch, as a limited edition of 5,500.

The 40mm 1965 Diver’s Modern Re-interpretation will be issued as a limited edition of 5,500.

This 200-meter watch features the same 55th anniversary blue-gray dial as seen on the trilogy and comes with both a stainless steel bracelet and a silicone strap. It is powered by Caliber 6R35 (not the Hi-Beat caliber used in the other 1965 model being released) that delivers a power reserve of 70 hours. It will be available starting in June 2020. Prices: $6,300 (1965 Diver’s Re-creation), $6,800 (1968 Diver’s Re-creation) and $4,500 (1975 Diver’s Re-creation). The 1965 Diver’s Watch Modern Re-Creation, 1,350 euros.    

Oris Carysfort Reef Limited Edition

Oris has introduced an impressive series of limited edition dive watches over the years, many of which incorporate a philanthropic cause into their finely engineered designs. The just-introduced Lake Baikal Limited Edition, for example, was created in partnership with the Lake Baikal Foundation to help raise funds to conserve the world’s deepest freshwater lake. 

Oris last week carried on its environmental fund-raising by introducing the Carysfort Reef Limited Edition, a significant new watch on two fronts: in its composition—it is the company’s first Aquis model in solid gold—and in its mission to help support the Coral Restoration Foundation, with which Oris has been working since 2014.

Based on the Oris Aquis GMT, the Carysfort Reef Limited Edition comprises just fifty pieces, each with a blue dial and SuperLuminova-filled hour markers and hands. The self-winding Oris 798 (base SW 330-1) movement that powers the watch offers hours, minutes, seconds, 24 hours and date, with a power reserve of forty-two hours.

Oris Carysfort Reef Limited Edition

The watch’s 43.5mm yellow gold case provides water resistance to 300 meters and features an 18-karat security crown and a bi-color rotating bezel. The caseback has a sapphire crystal inlay decorated with a Carysfort Reef motif and the number of the watch within the edition. 

The watch’s namesake, Carysfort Reef, is in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary near Key Largo, and it is part of the Florida Reef Tract—the third largest barrier reef in the world and the only barrier reef in the U.S. Since 2014 the Coral Restoration Foundation has been working to restore the reef, which has severely degraded over recent decades. The foundation has made great strides, this year aiming to return 30,000 corals to the reef—up from 25,000 last year.

And this is where the Oris Carysfort Reef Limited edition steps in. Oris is donating three watches to the cause, slated for auction over the next few months, and the funds raised will go directly to supporting the foundation’s work.

The watch, available in April, is fitted on a blue rubber-coated leather strap with an 18-karat gold pin buckle. Price: $19,000.