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Bulgari’s Octo Finissimo Perpetual Calendar took the top prize, or “Aiguille d’Or,” at the 2021 Grand Prix d’Horlogerie de Genève (GPHG) yesterday in Geneva.

Piaget, MB&F and Louis Vuitton took home two awards each, while a Special Jury prize was awarded to Dubai Watch Week.

The Bulgari Octo Finissimo Perpetual Calendar was the top prize winner at the GPHG 2021.
The Louis Vuitton Tambour Carpe Diem won the GPHG Audacy Prize 2021.

 

Here is a full list of the 2021 winners:

Aiguille d’Or Grand Prize: Bulgari, Octo Finissimo Perpetual Calendar

Ladies’ Watch Prize: Piaget, Limelight Gala Precious Rainbow

Ladies’ Complication Watch Prize: Van Cleef & Arpels, Lady Féerie Watch

Men’s Watch Prize: Grand Seiko, Hi-Beat 36000 80 Hours Caliber 9SA5

Men’s Complication Watch Prize: MB&F, LMX Titanium

Iconic Watch Prize: Audemars Piguet, Royal Oak “Jumbo” Extra-Thin

Tourbillon Watch Prize: De Bethune, DB Kind of Two Tourbillon

Calendar and Astronomy Watch Prize: Christiaan Van Der Klaauw, CVDK Planetarium Eise Eisinga

Mechanical Exception Watch Prize: Piaget, Altiplano Ultimate Automatic

Chronograph Watch Prize: Zenith, Chronomaster Sport

Diver’s Watch Prize: Louis Vuitton, Tambour Street Diver Skyline Blue

Jewelry Watch Prize: Chopard, Flower Power

Artistic Crafts Watch Prize: MB&F, LM SE Eddy Jaquet ‘Around the World in Eighty Days’

“Petite Aiguille” Prize: Tudor, Black Bay Ceramic

Challenge Watch Prize: CIGA Design, Blue Planet

Innovation Prize: Bernhard Lederer, Central Impulse Chronometer

Audacity Prize: Louis Vuitton, Tambour Carpe Diem

Horological Revelation Prize: Furlan Marri, MR. Grey Ref. 1041-A

Special Jury Prize: Dubai Watch Week

You check out all the GPHG 2021 winning watches here.

The 2021 nominated watches, including the eighteen award-winners, are on display in Geneva until November 14. The winning watches will then be on display at Dubai Watch Week, from November 24 to 28, and then in Paris from December 2 to 5.
 

A. Lange & Söhne is not content to update an existing model by simply expanding the watch’s case metal options, a tactic frequent among even the world’s finest watchmakers. We often see an existing model from this famed German watchmaker updated with a new movement, an updated dial treatment or even an entirely new case size.

The new A. Lange & Söhne Zeitwerk Honeygold Lumen.

So yes, the new A. Lange & Söhne Zeitwerk Honeygold Lumen, as its new name signifies, is newly draped in the watchmaker’s own warm-hued Honeygold alloy, the first time we’ve seen a Lumen watch cased in Honeygold.

But it should also surprise no one that the newest edition of one of A. Lange & Söhne’s most spectacular watches hosts several technical updates, in addition to its namesake new case metal.

Longer power reserve

The new watch also boasts Caliber L043.9, a new movement iteration. A. Lange & Söhne has updated the movement with a 72-hour power reserve, doubling the reserve of its predecessor model. This extends the operating time as it powers Zeitwerk’s three-disc jumping digital numerals mechanism.

Caliber L043.9, with an extended power reserve and a new constant force escapement.

 

A. Lange & Söhne has also heightened the caliber’s stability by adding a (patented) constant-force escapement to control the time display’s complex switching processes. As the watchmaker explains, the newest escapement generates the impulse for the jumping time display while also “drives the balance with nearly uniform power across the entire run time.”

The pusher at 4 o’clock is also new. This allows the hour indication to be separately switched, which makes setting the time quite a bit simpler.

And as the newest Lumen model in a series dating to the first Zeitwerk ‘Lumious’ from 2010, the Zeitwerk Honeygold Lumen employs the watchmaker’s specially developed light-permeable dial coating. This means all the numerals on the digital time discs ­– even those not visible on the dial – will absorb enough light needed to make them glow in the dark.

As you might expect from any watch leaving Lange headquarters Glashütte, this 41.9mm watch is finished to perfection. You’ll find hand-engraved balance and escape-wheel cocks, sunray-pattern winding wheels and filigreed, straight-grained constant-force escapement bridge that accommodates two recessed, screwed gold chatons.

Limited to 200 watches, the A. Lange & Söhne Zeitwerk Honeygold Lumen is attached to a handsome dark-brown leather strap. Price: $145,000.

 

Any visitor to Franck Muller’s vast headquarters in Genthod, adjacent to Geneva, will vouch for the technical depth this manufacture exhibits throughout the facility. Case after case of watches set with tourbillons and multiple complications testify to decades of watchmaking with a distinctive style, typically built into the brand’s trademark Cintrée Curvex-shaped case.

But there’s much more to Franck Muller than its range of Master Bankers, large tourbillons and jaw-dropping skeleton models. Few watchmakers can match the wide-ranging fluency the brand also demonstrates year after year with its gem-set collections.

Two examples of the new Franck Muller Double Mystery Peony.

Franck Muller has again paired its technical chops with its gem-setting expertise with the release of the new Double Mystery Peony, which combines gemstone setting and its enchanting Double Mystery time display system.

In the Double Mystery collection, Franck Muller replaces watch hands with two rotating discs, each with an arrow-shaped indicator. Patented in 1998, the technique allows Franck Muller to experiment by setting a colorful spectrum of gemstones across and atop of the two rotating discs.

In this latest Double Mystery Peony, Franck Muller sets 662 diamonds and colored gemstones (4.87 carats) on each dial, all shaped and patterned across the dial to recall the namesake bloom. The watches, powered by an automatic movement topped with the Double Mystery complication, are offered in white gold and yellow gold and in 42mm and 39mm cases. Price: $88,700

 

Now available in a karat gold case, the Junghans Meister Fein Automatic adds a luxurious aspect to this German brand’s dressy Meister collection.

The Junghans Meister Fein Automatic.

With its long markers and hands framed within a slim bezel, the Meister Fein Automatic differs from the more directly retro Meister Automatic, which features 1950s-style dauphine-shaped hands and somewhat shorter markers.

The newer Meister Fein Automatic model is also somewhat larger at 39.5mm in diameter when compared to the 38mm of the Meister Automatic line, but both wear snug to the wrist with their small, curved lugs, curved crystal and slim cases.

By removing the word ‘Automatic’ from the dial and affixing its traditional logo just below the twelve o’clock position, Junghans underscores its minimalist tendencies, which arise from early 20th century German design philosophies.

Junghans attaches the watch to the wrist with an elegant, seam-free black alligator leather strap. The strap, like the case, is gently curved.

And finally, Junghans rebuilds a base ETA movement to create its J800.1 caliber, which features a spherical, two-arm rotor with a gilded Junghans star. These additions are clearly visible through the sapphire crystal caseback.

Junghans will make 100 pieces of this limited edition.

Price: $8,000

Specifications: Junghans Meister Fein Automatic

Movement: Self-winding ETA-based J800.1 with two-arm rotor designed specifically for this model, and a power reserve of up to 38 hours. Rhodium-plated with blue screws, Junghans-designed rotor with sunray brush finish, gilded and polished plate as bearing cover over the rotor bearing.

Case: 39.5mm by 11.0mm gold, 4-screw back, convex and sapphire crystal with anti-reflection coating on both sides. Water resistant to 30 meters.

Dial: Matte silver-plated, convex, diamond-effect strokes as hour markings, historical Junghans logo, hands with curved pointers.

Strap: Black alligator leather with 18-karat gold buckle.

Price: $8,000.

 

Alexander Shorokhoff honors Austrian artist Gustav Klimt with Crazy Eyes, a chronograph dominated by a colorful dial and its two eye-like orbs. While these orbs replace the running seconds and chronograph minute subdials, additional ‘eyes’ seem to bounce around a dial further animated with colorful shapes and colors.

The new Alexander Shorokhoff Crazy Eyes, made in steel and in yellow-gold-plated 39mm cases (pictured).

The German-based Alexander Shorokhoff is also celebrating its 30th anniversary with Crazy Eyes, which could also describe how the Russian-born independent watchmaker often approaches creating his company’s watch dials. You might recall his Kandy and Levels models, just two of the colorful and Pop Art influenced watches included within the brand’s Avant-Garde collection.

Shorokhoff says that the “eyes” on this new watch’s dial are meant to “transmit a sense of joy, enthusiasm and mobility, literally dancing on the scene of the shiny dial.” He combines multiple layers on the dial using different materials, including mother-of-pearl, brass and luminescence.

At the top of the dial, however, Shorokhoff retains a prominent 60, which appears on all his designs to symbolize both the 60-second/minute position as well as the arts movements of the 1960s, where the watchmaker draws much of his inspiration.

Inside Shorokhoff fits a Russian-made Poljot caliber 3133, which his company has partially skeletonized, hand-engraved and refined. He explains that the caliber, now discontinued, is based on the Valjoux 7734 movement and was produced at the First Moscow Watch Factory from 1976 to 2004.

To complement the Crazy Eyes dial, Shorokhoff attaches a matching stingray strap colored bright yellow. He offers two 39mm case options, steel and plated gold, for those who want to extend the yellow color theme to the case. Each case option, however, will only be made in a limited edition of thirty pieces, with the gold-plated model priced with a $100 premium.

Prices: $2,300 (steel case) and $2,400 (gold-plated case).